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Wednesday , 22 October 2014 , 06 : 02 AM
The Blinding Knife Brent Weeks Review by Adrian Collins Where The Black Prism was a bit slow to kick off and sometimes got bogged down in explaining the magic system, The Blinding Knife floors the accelerator from the starting line. Before you get a moment to take a breath you're already 200 pages in, forgetting to go back to work after your lunch break, wondering just how the bloody hell it got to 3:00am on a work night. Weeks makes the right assumption that most readers will have read the previous book and doesn't get bogged down in magic system details, yet provides enough that new readers can pick up fairly easily on it without getting lost. We get to find out more and more about the possibilities of luxin and the drafters that use it as Weeks keeps expanding his magic system, not getting stuck on previous laurels, keeping old readers interested.  Weeks delves deeper into the twisted world of lies that Gavin lives in and explores his relationship with Karris further. Looking into the Blackguards through Kip and the Colour Prince's army through Liv provides some brilliant perspectives to lend the book the term 'epic' without much effort. At the same time, Liv's perspective provides some very interesting and very real feeling religious questions that resonate with any reader who has any link to a modern religion. The political power plays - especially a scene with the Spectrum and Gavin - are well thought out, brilliantly written, and choc full of built up pressure and the promise of a darker future. This book is an absolute cracker. I couldn't put it down. I give The Blinding Knife by Brent Weeks 4.5 Grimdark Lords out of five.      Support Grimdark Magazine and order The Blinding Knife from: Amazon: The Blinding Knife (Lightbringer) iBooks: The Blinding Knife -...
Tuesday , 16 September 2014 , 10 : 48 PM
THE BLACK PRISM By Brent Weeks Review by Adrian Collins Warning - Spoilers below Brent Week's The Black Prism is an enjoyable kick-off to the Lightbringer series. Those who love an in-depth and original magic system, coupled with politics and religion are really going to get a kick out of this one. The magic system is one of the best things about this work. It's original, well thought out, detaied, and grows wonderfully as you read. Readers who loved Brandon Sanderson's Mistborn will absolutely froth over this one. My personal tastes are for the magic to remain more of a mystery, so I found that the descriptions of the uses of luxin and the breaking down of light and magic classes slowed the first two-thirds of the book down. Having said that, I must admit that putting in the hard-yards on the magic system really pays off later in the book when the action and luxin are coming fast and furious. What really appealed to me in this book was the history of the Prism's War and the fallout of Gavin and Dazen Guile tearing each other apart. The manner in which Tyreans are treated, from the lowly peasant to the entire nation, rings true with history. The role religion has to play in that violence also rings true. The politics that flowed from there - such as where the great families loyalties lay - were also really enjoyable. But, as usual, what really shone in this book, as in most popular grimdark works, were the characters. Gavin and Dazen Guile were brilliantly written, with the twist really providing the punch that "that moment" has to have to make a book matter. Kip's internal monologue is funny, sad, annoying at times, but I feel like his thoughts would really resonate...