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Tuesday , 20 January 2015 , 08 : 57 PM
The Slow Regard of Silent Things by Patrick Rothfuss Reviewed by Adrian Collins Hachette Australia provided Grimdark Magazine with The Slow Regard of Silent things as an Advanced Reader Copy. I consider Rothfuss to be a bit of a borderline grimdarker and one of the finest purveyors of prose currently publishing in fantasy/sci-fi (and probably a fair few other genres, as well). However, this book is definitely not a Grimdark book. Not even remotely. The author points it out in both a blog post and a preface within the hardcover I was provided with (something I didn't check in the excitement of thinking I'd found Rothfuss' third novel-length instalment before requesting this ARC from Hachette in the name of this website). The story of Auri is an odd one. It's a story of loneliness and making the best of your situation. It's of imagination and perhaps a screw or two loose. It's about doing things the right way, even if it's the long way.The novella isn't a standard read, purposefully omitting big punchy twists and the like that Rothfuss delivers so well in The Name of The Wind and A Wise Mans Fear. It's more a story of a week in the life of the faerie-like girl who lives in the Underthing, all leading up to  a meeting with Kvothe -- Rothfuss' protagonist in The Name of the Wind and The Wise Man's Fear. She tends the underground chambers, hidden gardens, rooftops and all the odd assortments of forgotten rooms and tunnels in between, much in the way that a caring gardener would look after her lawn, roses and trees. I enjoyed the view into Auri's world. I'm not her biggest fan as a character, though I enjoy the part she plays in the Kingkiller Chronicles and wonder what part she might play...
Thursday , 28 August 2014 , 05 : 59 AM
ROGUES Edited by George RR Martin and Gardner Dozois Once again George RR Martin and Gardner Dozois have done a fantastic job in gathering stories from some of the biggest names in fantasy and science fiction. The characters are consistently grey. The stories vary through grim and gritty to fantastical and funny. And the central theme in each one, whether male or female, is a rogue. Abercrombie, Rothfuss, Lynch, Abraham, and Martin all contribute some fantastic works amongst a host of superlative authors. The stand outs for me were: Joe Abercrombie's piece 'Tough Times All Over' (First Law) which follows a package through the streets of Sipani as it's stolen time and time again by the city's interesting and colourful denizens; Gillian Flynn's 'What Do You Do?', a spine-tingling story about a con artist and a family she shouldn't have conned; Patrick Rothfuss's 'The Lightning Tree' (Kingkiller Chronicle) where we get to see a day in the life of Bast as he ventures from the Waystone Inn to learn lessons, trade secrets for riddles, and help the children (while also helping himself to the maidens) of the surrounding area; and, George RR Martin's 'The Rogue Prince, Or, a King's Brother' (A Song of Ice and Fire) where he tells us the story of Daemon Targaryen and his impact in the lead up to the Dance of Dragons. George RR Martin's short releases where the story is told with the voice of a maester recounting a historical research piece are really engaging. At first i thought they may read a bit poorly, as if Martin might just be trying to make a bit of extra coin out of his own historical notes. However, Martin very quickly gets you into the right headspace and has your imagination whirling as he adds layer upon layer of mouth-watering story...